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mirror-online-14-07-17

MIRROR ONLINE, JULY 14, 2017
COVERAGE FOR HSS

Builders say sexist ‘wolf whistle’ is insulting to women as many admit to changing attitudes

  • A poll of UK builders, plumbers, electricians and scaffolders has revealed a shift in attitudes, with many now drinking artisan coffee, enjoying healthy salads and listening to Radio 2

The “ wolf whistle ” could soon be a thing of the past – with builders admitting it’s unacceptable.

Nearly half of tradesmen said it was insulting to women and that they no longer do it.

The poll of UK builders, plumbers, electricians and scaffolders revealed a wider shift in attitudes.

Many of them now drink artisan coffee, enjoy healthy salads and listen to Radio 2 .

The research by tool hire firm HSS found that on a break, the hot beverage of choice is now more likely to be a skinny latte than a builder’s tea.

In fact, one in 20 labourers even opt for a fruit tea and a healthy 37% say they get by on mineral water to keep themselves hydrated.

A further four in 10 said the stereotype of a builder starting the day off with a fry-up was outdated and three-quarters said they didn’t know any construction workers who smoke or have tattoos.

More than nine in 10 tradesmen keep their van or vehicle clean and tidy, if not pristine and when it comes to food, two thirds admit to being on diets so they always opt for healthy lunch choices.

A spokesperson for HSS Hire said: “Like many industries, things have changed in the construction world – it’s a highly competitive field and many tradesmen, especially if they are self-employed, have to be at the top of their game.

“Things like a tatty van and being late can really put off customers.”

When it comes to travel and culture, the destination of choice for the typical tradesman would be somewhere in the UK, although a quarter take regular European city breaks.

But the hard graft doesn’t stop for tradesmen when they get home, with 71% claiming they start paperwork and reply to emails as soon as they get in.

Nearly four in 10 said it was wrong to assume all builders down tools early and head to the pub on a Friday.